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What Would it Take to Prevent CSS Tooltips From Overflowing?

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What Would it Take to Prevent CSS Tooltips From Overflowing?


Say you have an elements with CSS tooltips and you’re going to position those tooltips such that it opens up next to the element on hover (or probably better: when clicked/tapped). Next to it where? Above it? What if the element is already really close to the top of the screen? In that case, it should probably open below it. Or vice versa — and the same goes for the left and right edges of the screen. You definitely want it to be visible rather than overflowing the viewport.

Sometimes when you open new UI elements, they need to be edge-aware to prevent the content inside from triggering weird scrollbars, or worse, cutting off content.

A red button and an orange button, both with CSS tooltips, sitting above two large paragraphs of text. The orange button is hovered, revealing a tooltip to the right of it but it is cut off by the edge of the viewport, making the content illegible.
Very important what?!

This is an age-old problem on the web. I remember using jQuery UI tooltips on purpose because it had this special ability to be edge-aware. You can imagine the JavaScript behind it. You figure out where the element is going to be and use positioning math to figure out if it will be within the viewport. If it won’t be, try a different position that does fit.

As ever, everything old is new again. Check out Floating UI, designed just for this problem.

FloatingUI home screen showing a logo that looks like a CSS tooltip with a happy face.

Floating UI is a low-level toolkit to position floating elements while intelligently keeping them in view. Tooltips, popovers, dropdowns, menus, and more.

It looks super well done. I like the focus, the demos are super well done, and it’s a pretty tiny dependency.

But ya know what would be even cooler? If CSS could do this all by itself. That’s the vibe with CSS Anchored Positioning — for now just an “explainer” document:

When building interactive components or applications, authors frequently want to leverage UI elements that can render in a “top-layer”. Examples of such UI elements include content pickers, teaching UI, tooltips, and menus. “Enabling Popups” introduced a new popup element to make many of these top-layer elements easier to author.

Authors frequently wish to “pin” or “anchor” such top-layer UI to a point on another element, referred to here as an “anchor element”. How the top-layer UI is positioned with respect to its anchor element is further influenced or constrained by the edges of the layout viewport.

A four-by-four grid showing the same blue button positioned at different corners of each cell, and a tooltip that avoids the edge of the screen where the button sits.

I love it. The web platform at its best. Seeing what authors are needing to do and reaching for libraries to do, and trying to step in and do it natively (and hopefully better).



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